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John Baldacchino

  • Of oranges, carobs and loose alliances

    No, I am not going to engage on a tirade against Archbishop Charles Scicluna. But I have to say, his analogies need a bit of polishing. His take on oranges and carobs is faulty to the extent that here we are talking about fruit, at the very least...

  • A Republic in abeyance

    It would be a disaster for the Labour Party to think that there is nothing to learn from its second landslide in a row. Likewise, it would be fatal for the Nationalist Party to think that somehow things are the same as they were a few weeks ago,...

  • Two Labour victories and the politics of modesty

    Two Labour victories and the politics of modesty

    Now that the British general elections are sealed by leafy Kensington turning to Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour Party, one might start to make some sense of what could be said about last week, which, between Malta and Britain, saw two Labour victories...

  • Refusing to jump on the bandwagon

    Refusing to jump on the bandwagon

    This election has let many down in terms of what was expected to be a calmer state of affairs. Its circumstances were unwarranted and here I hasten to add that this is not because the Prime Minister called an early election, but — and here I have...

  • The discrete charm of Malta’s bourgeois democracy

    The discrete charm of Malta’s bourgeois democracy

    Those of us who could see an election approaching like a car crash in slow motion, anticipating an ensuing cacophony that would drive the Dalai Lama to absolute distraction, cannot help but aim for levity, especially when everything else becomes...

  • Those of us who are not shouting

    Those of us who are not shouting

    On September 19, 2016, I wrote an article which I titled A leader’s gamble, where I dwelled on the Panama papers and the political choices made by the Prime Minister. I won’t regurgitate my words but in my concluding question I asked whether we...

  • Schools and religious freedom

    Schools and religious freedom

    In 2009, I wrote an article titled, 'Religious education in schools' on The Times. It was prompted by Fr Rene Camilleri’s anxiety over how in their Matsec exams, students of religion “were simply ‘regurgitating’ answers (…) from parish catechesis...

  • Two ugly, boring and oppressive political parties

    Two ugly, boring and oppressive political parties

    Joseph Muscat’s Labour government and Simon Busuttil’s adopted strategy to oppose him, might shed some light on the anxiety that many voters express when faced with a choice between voting for either large parties or taking the risk and voting for...

  • Tacit Genocides and the curse of a punitive morality

    Tacit Genocides and the curse of a punitive morality

    While they take delight in using any opportunity to attack each other, our MPs have kept their peace over what is being planned by Europe, under Malta’s Presidency, with regards to refugees coming from Africa. This does not only tell us a lot...

  • Institutionalised quietism

    Institutionalised quietism

    Often, Malta reminds me of DeChirico’s work, and Maltese tribalism recalls those two solitary figures in his metaphysical paintings about which Italo Calvino wrote his essay Travels in DeChirico’s Cities. Calvino tries to imagine what these two...