Forever at sea
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Forever at sea

Peter Hale, Capt. Everett’s nephew, scattering his uncle’s ashes between Malta and Gozo last month.

Peter Hale, Capt. Everett’s nephew, scattering his uncle’s ashes between Malta and Gozo last month.

The ashes of Captain Alan Everett, who had made Malta his home after serving for many years as a Master Mariner in the Merchant Navy, were last month scattered at sea in the Malta-Gozo channel in accordance with his wishes.

Capt. Everett passed away on July 15 at the age of 69 after a brief illness. Malta had been his home for 35 years.

He originally got to know the island as a service point at the Drydocks for his James Fisher Everard tankers on their empty voyages back to the Gulf. The company charters vessels to carry petroleum products and has been ranked the best in Europe for health, safety and environmental protection.

After serving in the Merchant Navy for 46 years, Capt. Everett retired here seven years ago and is said by friends and family to have taken pleasure in the island’s way of life and its people.

 “Alan was a good, generous, loyal friend, alive with the fascination of his knowledge and interests, a joy and a privilege to know,” said his friend Paul Worthington, who first met Capt. Everett in 1988.

His friend, Mr Worthington said, was quietly proud of his achievement in becoming a ship’s captain and to be entrusted with such large and valuable vessels.

“But that pride was not expressed in any outward display, but in strong resolve to do his duty well and ensure the success of his voyages and the safety of all those he was responsible for. Vanity of any kind was absent from Alan’s personality, and he found it embarrassing in others.”

Vanity of any kind was absent from Alan’s personality, and he found it embarrassing in others

A popular figure at the Rose and Crown pub on Spinola Road, Capt. Everett’s dedication to life at sea went beyond technical competence, Mr Worthington said.

“He was fascinated, enthusiastic and hugely knowledgeable about the science of navigation and its relationship to astronomy.”

He vividly remembers enjoying a coffee with friends beneath a clear night of stars and Capt. Everett explaining the constellations and their roles in navigation, the principles of navigation and the history of the marine chronometer.

“You could not help but be inspired by his measured enthusiasm and patient ability to convey it clearly to those of us who lacked the depth of his understanding.”

Capt. Alan Everett (left) with his long-time friend Francis Mazzelli on the ferry to Gozo a few months before his demise. Photo: Paul WorthingtonCapt. Alan Everett (left) with his long-time friend Francis Mazzelli on the ferry to Gozo a few months before his demise. Photo: Paul Worthington

Capt. Everett was born and brought up in Colchester, Essex, not far from the sea on the southeast coast of England. He left home as a shy 16-year-old to study at King Edward VII Nautical College in London in 1965. After training as a navigation officer he embarked on a career that entailed travelling the world with established shipping companies.

His sister, Linda Hall, said he made it a point to stay in close touch with his family. Away at sea for months, he paid for his parents to have a telephone installed so he could contact the family regularly.

She too described him as very modest about his career and success. He remained single but made many friends during his travels. 

He felt a bond with Malta which made him decide to buy an apartment here.

“I remember him telling me, as we crossed over to Gozo on the ferry, that when he passed away he would like his ashes to be scattered in the channel…between the islands he loved and where he felt most at home.”

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