Health & Fitness
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Health & Fitness

  • Japan trial to treat spinal cord injuries with stem cells

    Japan trial to treat spinal cord injuries with stem cells

    A team of Japanese researchers will carry out an unprecedented trial using a kind of stem cell to try to treat debilitating spinal cord injuries, the specialists said on Monday. The team at Tokyo's Keio University has received government approval...

  • Shoulder conditions: ‘Keyhole recovery much shorter than open surgery’

    Shoulder conditions: ‘Keyhole recovery much shorter than open surgery’

    The shoulder is a ball and socket joint and is very mobile. The ball is kept in its socket through the help of various ligaments, cartilages and tendons. In the 1930s a surgeon called Michael Burman introduced a procedure using a keyhole camera...

  • Investing in our children’s health

    Investing in our children’s health

    Some of the most important factors that influence children’s and adolescents’ health include cardio-respiratory fitness, muscular fitness, physical activity and exercise. Research indicates that children’s health and fitness levels have an impact...

  • 'I've been bedridden since January 2018'

    'I've been bedridden since January 2018'

    Trying to be a good parent is a tough job, and to be a good parent with chronic pain is even tougher. Antoinette Sinnas is one mother living like this, and she knows the emotional side of it can cut even deeper wounds. Here, she opens up about...

  • Drugs: researchers shouldn't just focus on the harms

    Drugs: researchers shouldn't just focus on the harms

    Most drug research focuses on the harms they cause, but studying the pleasure they provide will improve our understanding of why people use them. Among other things, this knowledge could be used to help people who develop drug problems, such as...

  • Move over testosterone: another hormone is also vital for making boys

    Move over testosterone: another hormone is also vital for making boys

    Often the first question parents are asked after the birth of their child is “congratulations, girl or boy?”. For parents of one in 2,000 to 4,000 births, however, there is not an easy answer. This is when the baby has “ambiguous” genitalia, where...

  • Swelling and painful feet: the most common problems when you're pregnant

    Swelling and painful feet: the most common problems when you're pregnant

    Along with the rest of the body, being pregnant can have a huge impact on feet. More than half of expectant mothers experience some form of foot problem during pregnancy. But foot issues are often neglected, with other medical aspects of pregnancy...

  • WHO warns of 'backsliding' in measles fight as cases soar

    WHO warns of 'backsliding' in measles fight as cases soar

    The World Health Organization warned Thursday that efforts to halt the spread of measles were "backsliding", with case numbers worldwide surging around 50% last year. The UN health agency pointed to preliminary data showing that the disturbing...

  • Babies with healthier diets are more active and sleep better

    Babies with healthier diets are more active and sleep better

    Physical activity is important at all stages of life. It prevents obesity, improves well-being and reduces the risk of many chronic conditions, such as heart disease, arthritis and diabetes. Evidence shows that being active at a young age tracks...

  • Alcohol: putting a value on the hidden costs of drinking

    Alcohol: putting a value on the hidden costs of drinking

    Is it better to spend £3 on a bacon sandwich or a pint of beer? Or to spend £2,000 on a holiday in the Seychelles rather than fix a leaky roof? As consumers we are usually very able to decide which option offers the better return on our investment...

  • Cancer: new technique analyses tumours cell by cell to fight disease

    Cancer: new technique analyses tumours cell by cell to fight disease

    A new DNA sequencing technique lets scientists track genetic errors in individual cancer cells. For the first time, they can reconstruct a tumour’s life history and understand how an error in a cell’s DNA led to the uncontrollable growth of a tumour.

  • A pill for loneliness? If only it were that simple

    A pill for loneliness? If only it were that simple

    Loneliness affects people of all ages, young as much as old. It’s now seen as so serious it’s classified as a public health problem. It’s presented as an “epidemic” causing a wide range of health problems that threaten to cripple health...

  • In eastern Syria, the infants of a dying IS 'caliphate'

    In eastern Syria, the infants of a dying IS 'caliphate'

    They were born in a "state" that no longer exists, most to fathers who are dead and mothers whose countries don't want them back. These are the children pouring out of Baghouz. Their grimy faces are the only ones visible in the sea of black veils...

  • Artificial cornea breakthrough could lead to self-assembling organs

    Artificial cornea breakthrough could lead to self-assembling organs

    For every person in the world who receives a cornea transplant, there are 69 others who still need one. That leaves about 12.5m people with limited sight because there aren’t enough eye donors. But what if we could grow new corneas in the...

  • Turn down the volume: WHO takes aim at harmful smartphone use

    Turn down the volume: WHO takes aim at harmful smartphone use

    More than one billion young people risk damaging their hearing through excessive use of smartphones and other audio devices, the UN warned Tuesday, proposing new safety standards for safe volume levels. In a bid to safeguard hearing, the World...

  • Ecstasy users are more empathetic: could the drug have a therapeutic use?

    Ecstasy users are more empathetic: could the drug have a therapeutic use?

    If you’ve ever seen someone in a club on MDMA, it may not surprise you to hear it’s linked to a heightened ability to share other people’s feelings and emotions. Yet in our new study, we found that even when the effects have faded, mild MDMA users...

  • AI system spots childhood disease like a doctor

    AI system spots childhood disease like a doctor

    An artificial intelligence (AI) programme developed in China that combs through test results, health records and even handwritten notes diagnosed childhood diseases as accurately as doctors, researchers said Monday. From the flu and asthma to...

  • Richmond Foundation rebrands, with its eye on younger generations

    Richmond Foundation rebrands, with its eye on younger generations

    Organisations offering services related to mental health need to be more approachable for younger people, according to the Richmond Foundation. The NGO, which provides community mental health services, said most mental health related issues tend...

  • Why we should ask our doctors about lifestyle medicine

    Why we should ask our doctors about lifestyle medicine

    Lara Sierra looks into a new way of treating patients that could save lives and cut millions off healthcare deficits worldwide. So why don’t we know more about it? Physicians who specialise in lifestyle medicine tend to abhor the title. It sounds...

  • Beer before wine and you'll feel fine? No you won't...

    Beer before wine and you'll feel fine? No you won't...

    Plenty of us have been there: waking up after a night out with a thumping headache, feeling sick and swearing never to touch alcohol again. If only there were a way to prevent these terrible hangovers. It isn’t uncommon for us to mix our drinks,...